We Have A Choice

Every election cycle may see the creation of a legislative bill aimed directly at people on the sex offender registry. Regardless of what the bill is titled, there will always be an argument without supporting facts or evidence the bill “will keep children safe”. 

It has been only a month into a new political cycle. We are once again witnessing a national legislative agenda filled with residency restrictions, senior assisted living, exclusionary benefit schemes, parental rights, and other bills directly aimed at people on the sex offender registry. 

However, only a few short months ago, we heard manifestos of politicians exclaim criminal justice reforms and a return to compassion for human life. However, the same elected people that we count on to make that change and live up to their word are often the very people that alienate their agenda, returning to fear-laced propaganda and divorcing rational thought. 

If you were to take any of the current sex offense bills and remove the title “sex offender” and replace it with African-American, Jewish, Gay or Lesbian, or Latino, there would certainly be an outcry of discrimination. But that is what politicians do when creating law. The United States has been down that road before with Jim Crow-styled laws and loud politicized rhetoric that always seems to mention protections without any supporting facts or evidence. The truth is that historically once such laws if and when have been rescinded, there are years of apologies, compensation programs, and reeducation policies to heal all the decades of wrongdoing to ordinary human beings. 

It is all a more incredible lesson of what Nazi soldiers said after the war about witnessing atrocities and the rounding up of human beings they were told to treat as criminals. In their defense, Nazi soldiers would say, “I had no choice” or “it was my duty”. Nazi leaders would tout, “this is the protection of the fatherland”. Similar arguments are continually argued about the U.S. Civil War reconstruction era, the Hopewell Native American treaty, the Civil Rights Selma to Montgomery marches, to the Stonewall riots. However, the lesson learned moments are striking similarities that lawmakers and people haven’t learned much from history and continue to spew rhetoric to incite fear without data or evidence citing it is for America’s safety. 

As Americans, we ought to be striving for opportunities to educate and facilitate best practices towards confronting our worst fears by creating a fair policy for all. Instead, we continue to live in a world guided by Jim Crow laws with a McCarthy-styled methodology that everyone could be an offender or sympathizer. We shouldn’t want to live in a nation where fear drives us? 

Our leaders have a moral obligation to do the right thing for all people. While politicians lay claim to following a spiritual path, they too often stray, leaving behind moral thought and embracing corruption by saying, “I had no choice”. Thus history ultimately repeats itself, causing morality to be stuck in the mud. 

Perhaps the best medicine for our history is to become stewards of what is right and fair for all. But such action requires people to become active voices in pushing back. Never assume that others are doing the work for you. While people sat idly by and witnessed Nazi atrocities, civil, gay, or Muslim rights being egregiously violated, what are you doing to back up the voices that represent your concerns? Pick up the phone and call your legislative representative to voice your opposition to a bill. Invest in memberships to organizations that support your cause. Show up in person to your legislature, allowing your lawmakers to see advocacy no longer afraid. 

Dr. Judith Levine researched in 2016, African Americans account for 22 percent of publicly listed registered sex offenders nationally; they make up just 13 percent of the U.S. population. However, that number is staggeringly growing by the day. During this period of Black History Month, we ought to take a moment to reflect on how far we may have come but how far we have to go. We have a moral duty to get things right moving forward.

The Biggot In Us All

Many people may have a deep prejudice for anyone listed on a sex offender registry. The stigma of registrants went from a simple listing of constant identifiable threats to a list whereas anyone with an infraction of the word sex is a listable offense. That’s right! Offenses regardless of how significant or insignificant, have always been an integral and meshed part of the sex offender registry. It is no longer a listing of the habitual offender. Today the streakers, nudists, flashers, urinators, and sometimes masturbates in public settings are the midway point as the sex registry grows and expands.

There will always be heated debates as to what is a sex crime, which should be listed, and how that listing is to be used. But one thing is crystal clear; there is no easy solution as to what is the most credible threat of a sex offender these days thanks in part to the convoluted sex registry.

At some point, you or someone you may know has been convicted of something. Rather a traffic infraction or a serious crime, there has been some conviction that has been publically shared or encountered. However, thinking of that particular situation of, for instance, drunk driving, assault, or theft. Does that one black mark insist that the individual should be labeled for the rest of his/her life? Could you imagine a society where one drunk driving conviction would take away your driving privileges for the rest of your life? Better yet, what if there was a special license plate on a vehicle identifying the driver was convicted of a drunken driving encounter? How would you react or feel by that stigma? Better yet, does that conviction demonstrate a need that the punishment should continue for a lifetime? Well, welcome to how society has created the modern day sex offender registry. Of the one million US registrants, mostly all are first time convictions.

Mississippi is considering a DUi license plate. Ohio, Georgia and Minnesota issue DUI plates.


Additionally, most convictions are plea deals similar to those that receive plea deals for drunken driving or other criminal convictions. Before tossing out a narrative that drunk driving is far different than a sex offense; think again. Sex offender registries all across the nation have become a catalyst in adding arson, drug, homicide, and other crimes unrelated to sex crimes as a registerable public offense. Some states are currently in legislative processes to create a pet abuse registry. Sure, all these lists sound as if they serve a more significant cause of public safety. However, quite the opposite effect is taking place. These registries are not only the stigma of shaming efforts but are a threat towards liberty but also a threat to families all across this great nation.

When a state such as Alabama enacts a forced sterilization procedure for convicted sex offenders shouldn’t that alleviate the risk of ever offending again? Why not delist a potential offender from registry requirements if there is forced sterilization? Sounds like a reasonable trade-off? But Tennessee now wants to strip parental rights of registrants from their own families. Without sounding politically motivated, isn’t it the Republican Party and Libertarians that tout where the government should remain out of harm to families and protection of life? Don’t worry; the Democrats aren’t any better. They are the party of transparency, liberty, and human rights but are the first people demanding anyone “suspected” of a sex crime be put on a registry before they have a trial!? Isn’t sterilization or parental right terminations no different than abortion or a violation of the sanctity of family or the protection from divorce? I am sure evangelists will interject some rhetoric, but I warn any religion that “you can’t pick and choose the word of God.” Politics has no business managing families unless the family is in danger and has been assessed by a judge instead of a politician.

However, perhaps history has an eerie part in repeating itself through other means? Wasnt is the Nazi’s that created a list of Jewish people although they were not criminals? However, the Nazi’s deemed Jewish people criminals by enacting confusing and complicated policies. What about the Civil Rights movement? Didn’t policy and bigotry create many Jim Crow laws where African-Americans were quickly arrested for crimes that weren’t crimes? What about World War II and Japanese internment camps? What about the AIDS crisis of the 1980s when there was talk about an AIDS registry? LGBT rights where people were arrested for being gay/lesbian, What about the President of the United States that insisted on a Muslim registry? Do you see where this is going? We haven’t learned any lessons throughout history. We repeat history rebranding it as a clever marketing gimmick in the name of “public safety” and “maintaining higher morals.” There is no higher moral standard if the policy intends to do more harm than good.

Instead, there ought to be a point-blank suggestion pro-registry proponents are perhaps the torch bearers of bigotry. After all, it is demanding a listing of sex offenses without equal representation of other more serious criminal offenses that identify the cusp of prejudice. It is all about the generalization of sex and the disgust pretending to maintain Christian standards of becoming pro-registry citizens on the exterior, but in secret, these Christians prey on the internet to find their ill repute but when caught attempt to shame others claiming “they aren’t like the people on the registry!” It’s bigotry at its most elegant design and society dances around the registry as promoters of bigotry and its prejudicial issues. Prejudice is nothing more than hate filled with hate on top of hate. It doesn’t matter how you attempt to slice hate as a choice. It is still hating if you believe it should happen to others but not to you. If you want to fix something, then you find a solution to sustain help, with programs, and education. Instead, all we have over the past several decades is a hate list that keeps filling up; not because of sex crimes. Its because America wants to keep adding hate so that other people will hate too.

Keyboard Activist

When people, scholars, and advocates are told about the Civil Rights Movement, there are plenty of stories and references to share. Some prominent civil rights leaders naturally overshadow others that played a significant part. Most leaders we remember is either from lessons taught to us or the information we gather. Civil rights advocacy wasn’t solely on those who marched, spoke and wrote the most. Civil rights, to become a successful campaign and separate being labeled thugs or hostile people, introduced the practice of satyagraha. Satyagraha originated as a conceptual faith introduced and practiced by Mahatma Gandhi as a form of nonviolent resistance. Its use in India led to the nation claiming independence from the British Empire. The practice of satyagraha extends to others such as Nelson Mandela, Alice Paul, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Each of those leaders helped in ending apartheid, women’s rights, and equal access for all.

Satyagraha (sat·ya·gra·ha) noun – a policy of passive political resistance, especially that advocated by Mahatma Gandhi against British rule in India.

In all of the cases where nonviolent resistance was applied, harsh laws were created to suppress particular groups it affected. The number of arrests from all nonviolent resistance movements is too overwhelming to comprehend. The total number of deaths attributed cannot be accurately measured. The number of participants that took part in any form of civil, human and equality cannot be measured. Was satyagraha successful in its methods? That would much depend on which demonstration or protest that took place. Some were successful, and some weren’t.

In the early 90’s I began my journey as a protester, marcher, and activist for gay equality and rights. My first task was a database administrator for a group known as Digital Queers. While Harvey Milk, Bayard Rustin, and countless others before me laid the groundwork for LGBT rights, I began to understand a determined message of unity despite policy or personal indifferences. I was refused service at restaurants, endured random physical attacks, detained during demonstrations, shot at, was the target of a firebombing, fired for suspected of being gay, served trespass notifications, and outed by others within the gay community while they continued acting as a straight to be accepted without suspicion. These were just a few of the issues not only I personally endured, but many others standing beside me. But I embraced a non-violent or amended version of satyagraha to keep at peace that what I was doing was just. It wasn’t a journey for my gay rights. It was a journey for the rights of others afraid to come out. At every instance where my rights were either discarded, stripped, or placed me in fear I made it a habit to pray for others. I avoided a melancholy expression as not to give an impression of vulnerability by others. It may sound ridiculous for some but non-violence must be a mental conditioning of inner peace. I am not suggesting that everyone find their medicament or take up yoga. Instead, I am suggesting that peaceful methods of activism must instill healthy and composed well-being.

Digital Queers – a national nonprofit network founded in 1992 of gay techies working to provide access to the community. The first organization to partner with and implement an all Apple Computer Server Network. Many of the original members are senior level Apple employees.

Whether your advocacy is for equality, justice reforms, ending the sex registry, legalization of cannabis, or anything else that is dear to your heart being mindful, respectful, and comfortable goes a long way. Being aware that you are mentally up for the challenge is critical maintaining a sense of sanity. Do you want to be the face of the movement, a face in the crowd, or a face behind the curtain? It is your choice in how you wish to engage effectively. Most new activists seek an action plan, agenda, talking points, organizational reference, visibility markers to identify other allies or supporters. Respect for others is crucial to deescalate conflict. Every protest has some form of counter-protest. Respect must be a part of advocacy both internally and externally. Freedoms are foundations that everyone has a particular right and belief system. Being respectful in most occasions allows moments of diplomacy and perhaps new opportunities. Comfort embraces self and where your value add is most applicable. There have been protests where a few participants march but lots of spectators are in fact supporters. This is where mindful and respectfulness incorporates significant opportunities ahead. Often it is the crowd that assumes the visible measurability outcome more than leaders, opposition, supporters, or other factors.

There were and still are groups within the LGBT community that took measures to another level. The AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) perhaps became the unfiltered voice of how leaders and communities were ignoring the AIDS crisis in the ’80s. ACT UP was very successful in many campaigns to tackle misinformation by effectively shutting down businesses and sponsors by intensive internet campaigns designed by Digital Queers and many other LGBT organizations. Leaders, politicians, and journalists were prime targets by ACT UP anywhere a media camera was rolling for any forms of recording. ACT UP would interrupt any reporting to inject its message. It became so intense that many news reporters couldn’t go live or had to voiceover back inside a studio. It was tremendously effective. It still falls within the bounds of non-violent but more of an aggressive tactic. Many LGBT members had mixed views. But ACT UP served its useful purpose to target its focus on AIDS leaving other LGBT issues in the hands of respective organizations properly organized to handle them.

AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) is an international direct action advocacy group that began in 1987 working to impact the lives of people with AIDS (PWAs) and the AIDS pandemic to bring about legislation, medical research and treatment and policies to ultimately bring an end to the disease by mitigating loss of health and lives. To make a donation to ACT UP visit https://actupny.com

Fast forward today, and the world has witnessed a transformation where gay marriage, open military service, employment rights, and other LGBT issues are widely accepted where once was thought to be impossible to achieve. As soon as the champaign, glitter, and outrageous costumes were swept up and stored away so did the opposition to retread the tires creating another momentum to reintroducing a reformed path to keep their agenda alive. All forms of rights will inevitably be tested in every generation. Civil rights are continuously challenged today. Women’s rights are still relevant in society. Social justice became talking points for the right to health care, and prison reforms suddenly became justice reforms. No matter what you call it, rights will have a pro and con advocacy armed and organized to voice its strong opinion, and both will have leaders not readily identifiable by name today.

Advocacy is a serious business for some. It is what motivates them to get up each day to perform something with passion, life, and gives them the energy to live life. To others, advocacy is ad hoc and doesn’t necessitate a priority in their life, and that too is completely fine. There will be bitter divisions, personal attacks of character, finger pointing, hostilities, and discourteous behaviors by the opposition and from within. Just as MLK is revered today as the leader of civil rights many forget the names of the sit-in protesters at a lunch counter in North Carolina. It may be harder for most to remember any member from the Black Panther Party? It is not to suggest that what they contributed to their own agenda was negative or unjust. Instead, quite the opposite. What they did was for a passionate plea to be recognized for that particular moment in time. It is up to us as people to research those that contribute and often extend a moment of gratitude for what everyone brings to the table.

Black Panther Party, original name Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, African American revolutionary party, founded in 1966 in Oakland, California, by Huey Newton and Bobby Seale. The party’s original purpose was to patrol African American neighbourhoods to protect residents from acts of police brutality.

At present, my education, research, family, pets, friends, and God are the most important values in my life. My days of protesting are still deep within me. But I resource my advocacy to prioritize in an ad hoc fashion so that I may be at peace with self, others and plan my time effectively. I have always been a James Bond movie fan. However, a quote from that movie sums up how effective my career has led me. In the movie Skyfall there is a line that others have shared and assessed the characterization of me. “I can do more damage on my laptop sitting in my pajamas before my first cup of earl grey than you can do in a year in the field.” That is where I was in the ’90s with Digital Queers and where I belong today with university research and policy reforms with my laptop or iPad Pro ready to engage in this fast paced online world. I am grateful to those that undertake leadership roles. But I tend to root for those sitting in pajamas behind keyboards mistakenly viewed by some where they are also the ones changing and influencing the world by stealth and efficiency.

Immoral Majority: How NC Law Allows Sex Registrants to Vote; But Not Vote.

States have disenfranchised felons and now include sex offenders. The number of convicted in the US creates a concern for politicians that their vote that may be a vote against them. People are demanding reforms, but politicians fear losing power to those that have voting rights restored. But it gets more complicated as lawmakers create unnecessary hurdles to vote.

There has always been an assumption in America that voting is a right and privilege of its citizens. While the spirit of that argument may be meaningful, it’s not entirely accurate. The United States Constitution, when it was initially drafted and ratified, didn’t define who was eligible to vote. It left that decision up to states. On April 19, 1792, Kentucky was the first state to ban voting for anyone convicted of bribery, perjury, forgery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors. Soon after many states followed suit by prohibiting voting rights for those with conviction creating a term commonly known as “criminal disenfranchisement.” As the centuries passed and more Americans were becoming casualties of the prison system, the disenfranchised and advocates pushed to reform voting rights. Those affected by states refusing to allow voting of those convicted was gaining momentum in part by allowing a voice of the repressed. On June 24, 1974, The US Supreme Court ruled in the case Richardson v. Ramirez that disenfranchising convicted felons does not violate the Equal Protection Clause of the US Constitution. On April 16, 1985, the US Supreme Court ruled that criminal disenfranchisement Is legal in the case of Hunter v. Underwood.  The courts say voting standards are the responsibility of each state as long they do not discriminate against race, sex and those that reach the age of 18 on the day of voting. The state can rid of the homeless from voting if it chooses because they have no address to report. It is just how the law sometimes works without much sympathy for how it may impact the disenfranchised. 

Today justice reforms and voting rights have been hot topics of controversy delivered with undertones of mysterious voter fraud and gerrymandering redistricting planning that suggests disenfranchisement.  Election boards are often tasked to identify and disqualify those with felony criminal records. It is up to the voter to prove their rights have been restored if the state allows such a request. But what if voting rights are restored allowing those not confined to prisons or jails to vote freely? That would surely indicate the freedom to arrive on election day to cast your vote at your assigned polling place.  Absolutely not!  In North Carolina, all you have to be is on the sex offender registry, and the act of voting could mean spending five years in prison.  Why? Nearly all of the polling locations in North Carolina are at schools or places where registrants are prohibited. The 1000-foot rule ban for registrants applies to public or private schools. Registrants are forbidden to live, work, or loiter in these invisibly marked far-reaching areas protected by unforgiving and harsh penalties. The loosely written 300-foot law was added later preventing registrants anywhere a daycare operates (private home or business) and where minors “frequently congregate.”  A minor by state law is 18 years of age. Examples of restricted locations include, but not limited to libraries, arcades, amusement parks, recreation parks, swimming pools, museums, shopping malls, and fairs. The law also suggests that restaurants, businesses, and places of worship with play spaces or care services specifically intended or scheduled for minors are off limits and subject to immediate arrest. (G.S. 14-208.18) Basically, forget trying to eat at a McDonald’s without fear of someone reporting a sighting of a sex offender sitting at a table far from the play area. Therefore, don’t stop to eat at McDonald’s, then drive to the library to pick up the newest book available on your way to vote in the next election before treking home. That registrant perhaps just added 20 years of prison time for all those offenses.

However, there is a workaround allowing registrants access to voting in person. First, a registrant with voting privileges must contact his/her County Board of Elections. Usually, there is a form to request an absentee ballot. Once the form is submitted and approved a ballot will be mailed weeks before an election. It is that moment an individual can vote in the privacy of their own home. However, that person will need two required signatures from relatives or acquaintances as proof that they are who they claim to be. If registrants have no family support or available friends,  the voter must locate and pay for a Public Notary to officially stamp and certify the ballot. Lastly, the absentee voter, once again, has to pay for postage to mail the excessively large envelope back before the voting deadline. It is safe to say registrants must pay $6 each time they vote

If you are that rare and daring registrant that chooses to vote in person on election day, then you may test your luck. There is an unusual step, according to law, that loosely allows voting registrants to appear in person. First, the registrant must call the school where the voting takes place. Second, speak with the principal of the school and disclose the full name of the registered sex offender assigned to that location to vote. Third, if the principal agrees, then they must contact the County School Board of its decision to allow and escort at all times an offender on the property. Fourth, the School Board office contacts the Sheriff for guidance. Fifth, the offender is eligible to vote with police and school staff shooing families away until the registrant casts a ballot and leaves. But this tested method in practice never really works. Voters and principals don’t coordinate well with polling stations filled by long lines and the ill-timing of when registrants can arrive to vote.  Early voting has its limitations too. Many satellite polling stations are at community colleges, public libraries, and YMCA locations. All of these places are off-limits or have a policy that forbids registrants.

People often ask, “why not just sneak in and out to vote?” One, it is unlawful and a public record that a vote took place in person. Two, deputies and police often patrol school grounds as resource officers keeping the schools safe in addition to voter security during high voter turnout. If an officer recognizes a registrant, then they are subject to immediate arrest for being on or near school property.  A person can exclaim the principle has been notified in advance, and no children are present. It doesn’t matter because registry compliance laws are all felonies. There are limited protections within the law that allowing voting rights to registrants. However, officers typically say, “tell it to a judge.” It will always be the discretion of an officer should they choose to arrest or not. Cases in North Carolina Sex Offender Arrests for compliance violations usually say somewhere in police reports “loitering around an area minors frequent.” If minors are not present, it doesn’t matter if an arrested individual is sitting in jail only to have the case dismissed. The arrest and waste of taxpayer time, resources, in addition to crafting a charge that isn’t true but indirect significantly shakes the core of “letter and spirit of the law” of those affected. The state is the body of government that decided to use schools for polling locations but perhaps deliberately did so to keep a sex offender from voting? Nearly twenty-thousand registrants are intimidated, discouraged, and effectively banishes from reasonably accessible voting, educational, public, and right to purchase property in North Carolina. 

When California introduced its version of a state sex offender registration program, its primary target was to criminalize and shame homosexuality. By the mid-’80s, the registry grew to other states targeting the worst possible repeat sex offenders. It also somewhat targeted homosexuals entangled in sexual acts with boys or consensual adult sex in public restrooms. If caught police would put into action a shaming campaign to large print media agencies and publicly mentioning them by name in community awareness meetings. Officers would describe in graph detail laced with description what transpired at the scene facilitating a sensation for others to change the story to uncontrollable measures. During that period there were no restrictions, no websites, no laws interfering with registrants. Instead, it was a carefully coordinated effort to identify and isolate a group found undesirable and highly promiscuous – as portrayed by police. Naturally, the stories police, politicians, and in the name of religion were a continual targets to purge gay life.

A couple of years later California fundamentalists and a powerful lobby group known as the Moral Majority began a campaign to insert a highly charged conservative agenda to change what were perceived by the group to be threats to society. Ronald Reagan was not elected President just yet.  The mission of the Moral Majority was to mobilize a conservative political force for judgeships, Congress, and ultimately making Reagan the 40th President of the United States. It succeeded to do just that. It’s behind the scenes mission was to influence its agenda to the presidency, media, politics, businesses, and grass-roots communities.  A part of that agenda was to mobilize others to support traditional family values, condemning homosexuality and the responsibility for the AIDS crisis, and sexual perversion.  As the AIDS epidemic became a nightly news controversy, the Moral Majority would take to the airwaves, congregations, and radio stations across America suggesting that those with HIV or AIDS be listed on a registry. Public panic directed fear of homosexuals because they may be infected with HIV. There were awful slurs uttered that being gay also meant they are pedophile tendencies and have an agenda to infect children. It’s not uncommon to hear today that gay men are attracted to boys. It is an irrational charge that not only perpetuates lies and innuendo but extends to other groups, mainly registered offenders.  The footprint of the now-defunct Moral Majority continues to linger with fundamentalist rhetoric. It continues to lay claim that “we must tighten and purge any forms of deviant sexual behaviors because there is no cure for this sickness.” As the fundamentalist’s voices become louder, so will the influence and persuasive theme that “if you say it enough, people will believe it.

Today the registry is far incredibly beyond the visions of the Jacob Wetterling Act of 1994, Megan’s Law of 1996 and the Adam Walsh Act of 2006.  The registry has become a state’s rights shaming tool adding anything in any way it sees fit. The registry has evolved into this societal human data dumpster where anyone can be listed for life and unable to do anything to stop it. Three major federal acts working in concert with individual states, municipal, and town ordinance makes the registry a conundrum nearly impossible to absolve in our lifetime. Law enforcement, politicians, and fundamentalists sell and absorb it to distribute to the masses. It is when politicians create laws that restrict any form of a consistent voice is where the war on sex offender reform must begin. That discussion must include false labels, hysteria, sensationalism, lack of facts, and it’s compulsive-obsessive must-have access without any idea what to do with the information provided. At some point, the registry will become so massive that it will not only surpass jail and prison populations but will trickle into travel, insurance, health, and financial agencies as forms of approval creating black market services that will allow other criminal networks to flourish.

When North Carolina passed its comprehensive child congregation law, it made it impossible for registrants to visit his/her elected official in the state legislature. Because school groups, children, and other youth programs take place on legislative property, it disallows registrants being on the property. If representatives from NARSOL were to request a city demonstration permit to protest at the N.C. Legislative Building, it perhaps would be approved. However, all of the participants on the registry would be arrested. Merely engaging in legal, civic, and public space creates unreasonable and unconstitutional methods. If the state proceeds with plans to kick registrants off the internet, then it will add to the impossibilities to email an elected official to protest current or future legislation. The right to demonstrate, right to use libraries, pools, public parks, churches, access to voting, loitering, damaging mischaracterizations, banning registrants from use of the internet to contact his/her elected officials are “nails in the coffin.” The intent of the registry today is to uplift disenfranchisement to an insurmountable level where reforms and rehabilitation will never be allowed to have a voice. 

Assessing LGBT issues in contrast to registered sex offenders is essential. While many may disagree with similarities, the laws that once restricted and intruded upon gay life, suspicion, and rumor are strikingly similar to that of registrants. Gays were fired from jobs for suspecting to be gay. Accesses to lawmakers was always a closed door to gay advocates. Pools didn’t want gay people fearing that AIDS would infect the water. Street gangs would beat up gays on the way to polling to intimidate and frighten. Churches didn’t want gays and if they did insist, they attend conversion therapy (similar to sex offender treatment). Gays were often subject to arrests just for being gay. Thanks to the Stonewall Riots in New York, the intimidation suddenly stopped. I’m not suggesting registrants’ riot or commit acts of violence. But all of these acts didn’t require being on a registry. LGBT citizens have been erroneously mislabeled, arrested for protesting, arrested for consensual actions, wrongly accused of misconduct, and the list is nearly identical for registrants.  What the gay community did to change that was come together and unify, much like NARSOL and other organizations. It is safe to say that the message often isn’t unified or in agreement. That is completely okay.  But it is ultimately crucial that a message from all walks of life, backgrounds, genders, religious affiliation, identity, political influencers, age, race, and disabilities become a louder and amplified voice for how legislation, restrictions, and promotion of the culture of fear standard hurt families, commerce and a create a pathway towards socialism. Being told where to live, where to work, what’s off limits, no accesses to God or religion, told where and when to shop, to ask permission to attend school, standing in food bank lines to get a loaf of bread and report to the police periodically when requested. It has the smell of communism but branded as socialism.  

This very moment, registrants are the newly rebranded “Immoral Majority“. Its mission to engage with media such as radio, print, or television. Contact politicians, support businesses that hire registrants or formerly incarcerated, actively vote, and speak about how family values have been disruptive and an impact to self and others because of the registry. Be persistent, professional, to the point, thankful for the opportunity to be heard, and unafraid of constant rejection. Lastly, pray for self and others. The message to lawmakers is that “voting rights of a million registrants and growing aren’t disenfranchised anymore.”  As American citizens, there must be equal access under the law and spirit of independence without fearing our neighbor. The silence attempt by legislation is clearly an attack on democracy, freedom, and justice.  The registry is an un-American tactical product disguised as an act of safety but delivered as a Ponzi scheme. Registrants may be the swing vote to turn the next election? 

Where Is My Copy Of The Gay Agenda?

During the 1990’s I remember when gay equality was for many in the LGBT community was an in-depth secretive discussion. In fact, there was still the onset fear of being openly identified as gay or lesbian that many gay dance clubs or establishments wouldn’t open its doors until after 11PM. Many gay men wouldn’t show up until later knowing that heterosexuals were safely tucked away in their beds. Gay men would reverse park their cars to shield license plates being easily identified, and military base decals were obscured with tape or cardboard to hide from military police. After an evening of dancing and entertainment between gay members would suddenly end when Donna Summer’s hit “, Last Dance” was played. It marked the bar was closing, and the end of gay-themed fun would quickly resort back toward heterosexually-based demeanors and acting abilities of a straight-laced society.

The days of the gay bar seem long gone or appear to become mainstream leaving many in the LGBT community without an identity to call its own. When President Trump signed FOSTA (Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act), you might as well shot the heart out of the gay community. This is not to imply that gay men are prostitutes. Instead, it suggests that gay men used many adult-themed personal websites to meet one another.  Gay men, having few remaining outlets to seek other gay men, utilize, or used to access Backpage, Craigslist, or other hookup sites for dating, random sex or companionship. It has been the iconic staple for the gay community along when print ads would list men seeking men columns. Basically, it was the only outlet that allowed consenting adults to engage in not only sexual activity but a way for gay men to meet other gay men. However, male escorts and other sex workers were scattered in between the websites blending in with ads and conservatives sought a chance to forever close access to one part of the gay community. Overnight, Backpage, Craigslist, and countless other gay sites went dark due to government intervention due in part to FOSTA.

I used to laugh at the notion back in the 90’s when conservative lawmakers would make noise about “The Gay Agenda.” Strange that I never got my copy, but all the conservative lawmakers did? Despite the passage of gay marriage and specific LGBT equalities I always felt that the conservative agenda is to turn back the clock in the gay community. FOSTA, religious freedoms by the U.S. Supreme Court, repeal of transgendered in the military, the sex offender registry used as a weapon for allegations 30 years old or older, rollback of adoption laws, and countless other should be enough proof that anti-LGBT legislation is coming and shifting gay cultures. States with conservative lawmakers are rushing bills through committee quickly. While the nation is focused on Trump’s twitter feed legislation is blindsiding many LGBT Americans.

Personally, what two consenting adults do in the privacy of his/her bedroom is no business of mine. Other nations continue to engage in legalized prostitution or apps without government oversight, but they too are experiencing influence from not conservatives, but liberals that fought for pro-sex laws. Liberals in the German legislature seek to end legalized prostitution referring to #metoo influences and other fear-based and unfounded tactics. German conservatives surprisingly are against criminalizing or making sex worker registration more difficult. German conservatives cite that creating additional bureaucratic measures may begin pushing sex workers in the shadows similar to failed American sex culture. At least the Germans appear to be on the right strategy. Other nations don’t seem to be glued to mobile phone apps for gay hookups or dating, but it is a resource most accepted by the LGBT community. Its public policies and attitudes are far more accepting of the LGBT communities than the United States. In fact, many gay clubs continue to operate robustly allowing a healthy mixture of LGBT allies or the curious to enter its realm thanks primarily in part of sites such as Craigslist, Backpage, and other former websites affected by FOSTA.

Gay bars and gay dance clubs in America are closing based on an aging gay population leaving many young gay/bi men without places to call its own. It appears that neighborhood gyms are the newest substitute in gay meetings and hookups. Gay men are resorting to phone apps such as Tinder, Surge, Jack’d, Grindr, Scruff, and others. While that may appear okay to some, it provides a scary territory to LGBT members because of safety concerns.  However, when will these apps be affected by FOSTA and be taken offline leaving fewer choices? The conservative anti-gay agenda seems entirely clear to rid of LBGT communities, web access, bars, clubs, and apps once again isolating human beings from equal access. If the LGBT community isn’t careful, it may end up playing Semisonic’s “Closing Time” for any gay-themed establishment well before the end of the Trump-Pence presidency.