We Created Discrimination​

Many believe that prejudice is influenced or taught in the home. I suspect that could be a plausible argument. However, I tend to think that forms of discrimination are formed from particular events. I would cite such facts such as soldiers being deployed to Iraq and engaging with faction groups posing as soldiers. It could also be argued that military leadership paints a portrait of Muslim culture or middle easterners as radicals. We commonly hear and see this rhetoric often by soldiers displaying “morale” patches or scribbled helmet sayings similar to the days of “Commie Killer” adorned on cold war helmets.

But why are Americans suddenly anti-Latino or anti-Mexican? Immigrants typically embrace jobs that American youth won’t take or apply. Is it that unfair prejudice is actually our malice and bitterness is that they are employable while most American youth won’t take a moment to apply? It reminds me of the days where migrant workers filled American farmlands picking anything from cotton to yams far less in wages, benefits, and protections than the typical American worker. Generations beforehand worked side by side to pass on time treasured traditions ensuring that families would hopefully pass on to future generations. Eventually, those generations abandoned the hard and heat sweltering work. This the era of migrants to fill the slack left by younger generations to seek higher education or other employment means. It was American farmers that opened the floodgates to welcome anyone that would take jobs ranging from farms, manufacturing, production lines, janitorial, cooking, and other low paying or low skill jobs. Today we see job construction sites filled with not faces of the typical white or afro-American worker. Instead, we see construction sites all over America with a diverse mix of Hispanic and foreign workers. What I don’t understand is companies and individuals insist on hiring Latino workers while at the same time treat them as potential criminals or quasi-servants. It is as if the middle and low class of Americans have somewhat created the underclass of society that will work but ridicules that class for taking all the jobs available in the first place? It doesn’t make sense, but we use immigration law to argue about the legality of something Americans skirted the law in the first place.

When any form of leadership creates a dialog that a particular group of people is criminally prone with no facts to support it, then perception becomes a reality. Influences such as hate-filled speech lead to discrimination. With that being said, Latinos as a whole in America have been falsely criminalized. There are those that oppose such language but appear to be falling on deaf ears or silenced by the power of government influence. Folks, a lot can happen in four years during a Presidential cycle. But what has transpired over the past year has the recipe of leading from political divisions towards a severe civil war where the firestarter could come from the Latino community – and legitimately so. I certainly do not wish or want any forms of fighting. But individuals within society have a right to protect their integrity and stability that they refrain from becoming labeled or wrongly classified. When certain politicians decide to take it upon themselves to invoke religious scripture, then society may experience repercussions like no other they have witnessed.

A suggestion to return to some form of normalcy is for Americans to accept responsibilities that they habitually cut corners by outsourcing, allowing immigrants, don’t enforce hiring practices, and skirt issues to get ahead. It is somewhat strikingly similar where Americans would foolishly recommend that if African Americans were not happy with America that they could go back to Africa. Such exaggeration is not only stupid but a magnification of how and where discrimination and bigotry originates.

Every so many decades Americans disdain for other cultures publically airs its own forms of prejudice. Such recent events are when Japan during the 1970’s gas crisis began importing cars to the United States. 1980 were when China started to import cheaper manufactured goods. 1990 were when people from India began infiltrating customer service and high tech job markets. 2000 when suddenly Mexicans that had been here in the millions were decidedly a threat to Caucasian populations. Perhaps we should take a moment and remember that the melting pot doesn’t belong to any race, religion, creed, sex, or identity. Just because you discover it doesn’t make it exclusively yours. We are a society elected by people supposedly of laws. But when we create laws to enforce upon a particular class of people, then we are no longer a democracy.

Democrats felt the Bern on Election Day

Democratic Party and Hillary campaign staffers ultimately shuttered out Bernie Sanders supporters.

Since the day after the election, I have watched media outlets nearly overload its own circuits at how Trump miraculously won. It is somewhat like watching and listening to everyone taunt that Santa is coming to town, but he fails to show. That suggestion alone may be another reason that Hillary lost the election. Sure, we could go through all the conspiracy theory rhetoric claims from Russia, the CIA director, voter fraud and other issues. But one thing is very clear, the Democratic Party and Hillary campaign staffers ultimately shuttered out Bernie Sanders supporters. The Democratic Convention was perhaps a warning that Sanders supporters would alienate its own party on election day.

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What I failed to hear from Hillary over the course of her campaign was her connection to the working class. Instead, I would argue that Trump made a much better connection with these voters primarily with his snake oil sales pitches. Hey, it doesn’t have to be true, but you do have to connect to get voters to the polls. Apparently, Trump won those voters while Hillary alienated the Sanders camp. There was little or no mention about Bernie’s visions and how to mesh those camps together, other than just get to the polls. This was, in my opinion, no way to connect with its party and perhaps a crucial part of how Hillary lost an election. What I did hear over and over is that Hillary would be our first female president. While I would have been grateful to witness that moment, it didn’t provide a credible quality to my needs as a voter.

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Many political observers felt during the election cycle that the Republican Party was dead. Instead, Trump rebranded it and sold it to the American people. The Democratic Party had a fracture all along and pretended it had no outstanding issues. The biggest problem was that it didn’t rally its own party to show to the polls and perhaps abandoned nearly half of its Sanders supporters along the way. I would argue that the Democratic Party might be on life support or in need of some anti-anxiety medication for future elections. Perhaps the Democratic Party needs to rebrand itself. It’s going to be a huge struggle now that we have a Republican president and Republican controlled house and senate. There is also a significant possibility that the U.S. Supreme Court will shift towards becoming majority conservative. Was the Republican Party really dead? I think not. It was the Democratic Party that became complacent and overly confident of the American people. It was the Democratic Party that fell asleep during this election year and incidentally gave out Ambien pills to the Sanders supporters it should have been energizing all along.

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